Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup

Found on the menu of every single Taiwanese restaurant in America, the Beef Noodle Soup is a popular favorite (my husband’s favorite). The soup draws influences from the Sichuan province but the flavor is completely unique. There is no other Beef Noodle Soup that tastes like this.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons of cooking oil

2 pounds of beef

1 inch ginger (peeled and cut into slices)

6 garlic cloves (cut into slices)

1 large tomato (coarsely chopped)

1 tablespoon of chili bean sauce

1 cup of rice wine

1/2 cup of light soy sauce

1/2 cup of dark soy sauce

3 quarts of water

1 star anise

Directions:

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Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a skillet over medium high heat. Once hot, add beef to the pan. Cook, flipping with tongs until both sides are gently browned about 6 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate and set aside.

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Heat another tablespoon of cooking oil in a large soup pot until hot. Add ginger, garlic, and tomato. Stir for a minute.

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Return beef to the pan and stir in chili bean sauce. Stir in wine and bring to a boil. Let it boil for a minute.

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Add light and dark soy sauces, water and star anise. Bring just to a boil and then reduce to low simmer. Cover and cook for at least 2 hours. Cook the noodles according to the package instructions. Divide noodles among bowls and ladle the soup into each bowl with beef, top with scallions.

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Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup

  • Servings: 6
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Popular Favorite Taiwanese Recipe

Found on the menu of every single Taiwanese restaurant in America, the Beef Noodle Soup is a popular favorite (my husband’s favorite). The soup draws influences from the Sichuan province but the flavor is completely unique. There is no other Beef Noodle Soup that tastes like this.


Credit: cookboldfood.com

Ingredients

2 tablespoons of cooking oil
2 pounds of beef
1 inch ginger (peeled and cut into slices)
6 garlic cloves (cut into slices)
1 large tomato (coarsely chopped)
1 tablespoon of chili bean sauce
1 cup of rice wine
1/2 cup of light soy sauce
1/2 cup of dark soy sauce
3 quarts of water
1 star anise

Directions

1. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a skillet over medium high heat. Once hot, add beef to the pan. Cook, flipping with tongs until both sides are gently browned about 6 minutes. Transfer the meat to a plate and set aside.
2. Heat another tablespoon of cooking oil in a large soup pot until hot. Add ginger, garlic, and tomato. Stir for a minute.
3. Return beef to the pan and stir in chili bean sauce. Stir in wine and bring to a boil. Let it boil for a minute.
4. Add light and dark soy sauces, water and star anise. Bring just to a boil and then reduce to low simmer. Cover and cook for at least 2 hours. Cook the noodles according to the package instructions. Divide noodles among bowls and ladle the soup into each bowl with beef, top with scallions.

 

 

 

Beef Short Rib Soup (Galbitang)

Happy New Year! It’s full on winter in Boston and my kids are singing “Let it Go” from their beloved Disney movie, Frozen. But that doesn’t mean we should be shivering in the 2 degree weather. We can warm our hearts and souls with Beef Short Rib Soup. This Korean recipe will nourish your body in the harsh winter months.

Ingredients:

3 pounds of short ribs

1 onion

4 cloves of garlic

2 eggs

4 scallions

Salt and Ground white pepper to taste

Directions:

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Boil short ribs in a large pot of boiling water for 5 minutes.

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Clean short ribs under cold running water.

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Prepare another pot of boiling water, add short ribs, onion and garlic. Bring it to a boil, reduce to low heat, covered, and simmer for 2 hours.

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To make the egg topping, scramble two eggs in a bowl. Heat skillet over medium high heat, pour egg mixture and fry for about one minute on each side. Remove egg from pan and let it cool. Slice egg into strips.

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Top each bowl with a piece of short rib, egg strips, scallions, and soup. Ready to serve.

Beef Short Rib Soup (Galbitang)

  • Servings: 6 to 8
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Rich and Hearty Korean Soup

Happy New Year! It’s full on winter in Boston and my kids are singing “Let it Go” from their beloved Disney movie, Frozen. But that doesn’t mean we should be shivering in the 2 degree weather. We can warm our hearts and souls with Beef Short Rib Soup. This Korean recipe will nourish your body in the harsh winter months.


Credit: cookboldfood.com

Ingredients

3 pounds of short ribs
1 onion
4 cloves of garlic
2 eggs
4 scallions
Salt and Ground white pepper to taste

Directions

1. Boil short ribs in a large pot of boiling water for 5 minutes.
2. Clean short ribs under cold running water.
3. Prepare another pot of boiling water, add short ribs, onion and garlic. Bring it to a boil, reduce to low heat, covered, and simmer for 2 hours.
4. To make the egg topping, scramble two eggs in a bowl. Heat skillet over medium high heat, pour egg mixture and fry for about one minute on each side. Remove egg from pan and let cool. Slice egg into strips.
5. Top each bowl with a piece of short rib, egg strips, scallions, and soup. Ready to serve.

 

 

 

 

 

Taiwanese Danzai Noodle Soup

of Fujian origins, Danzai noodle soup is a popular snack food in Taiwan. While simple, made from a single shrimp on top of hearty minced pork sauce, the noodle soup is so loved that many restaurants focus on serving only this dish on their menu.

Ingredients:

6 large shrimps with heads and shells

6 cups of Simple Pork Soup Stock

1 pound of Asian egg noodles

1 cup of Pork Sauce

2 scallions, trimmed and finely chopped

rice vinegar to taste

Directions:

Peel and devein the shrimps. Remove the heads and set aside to place in a pot. Cover with stock and bring it to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook in simmer, uncovered, for about 5 minutes. Remove the shells with a slotted spoon. Drop in the shrimps and boil until firm and fully cooked about 2 minutes. Transfer from the soup with a slotted spoon and set aside.

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Boil the noodles according to the package instructions and drain. In a separate pot, warm up the  pork sauce. Divide the noodles among 6 serving bowls. Top each bowl of noodles with a spoonful of pork sauce and one shrimp. Ladle in the soup. Sprinkle on scallions and drizzle a couple drops of vinegar to taste. Ready to serve.

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Taiwanese Danzai Noodles

  • Servings: 6
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Cantonese Style Beef Stew

of Fujian origins, Danzai noodle soup is a popular snack food in Taiwan. While simple, made from a single shrimp on top of hearty minced pork sauce, the noodle soup is so loved that many restaurants focus on serving only this dish on their menu.


Credit: cookboldfood.com

Ingredients

6 large shrimps with heads and shells
6 cups of Simple Pork Soup Stock
1 pound of Asian egg noodles
1 cup of Pork Sauce
2 scallions, trimmed and finely chopped
rice vinegar to taste

Directions

1. Peel and devein the shrimps. Remove the heads and set aside to place in a pot. Cover with stock and bring it to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook in simmer, uncovered, for about 5 minutes. Remove the shells with a slotted spoon. Drop in the shrimps and boil until firm and fully cooked about 2 minutes. Transfer from the soup with a slotted spoon and set aside.
2. Boil the noodles according to the package instructions and drain. In a separate pot, warm up the pork sauce. Divide the noodles among 6 serving bowls. Top each bowl of noodles with a spoonful of pork sauce and one shrimp. Ladle in the soup. Sprinkle on scallions and drizzle a couple drops of vinegar to taste. Ready to serve.

 

Silken Tofu with Pickled Radish Soup

This is an modest but delightful dish made with delicate tofu and crunchy pickles in a savory broth. For a heartier variation, you can add pre-cooked chicken slivers to the soup (left over rotisserie chicken, anyone?)

Ingredients:

1 package of silken tofu

1 package of pickled radish

1 teaspoon of cooking oil

2 cups of water

1 scallion (thinly sliced)

Salt

Ground white pepper

Directions:

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Heat oil over medium high heat in a skillet. Add pickled radish. Stir until fragrant for about one minute.

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Add the water, bring to a boil and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Add tofu into the water. Let it simmer and absorb the flavors of the broth for about 10 minutes. Scoop into a bowl, sprinkle on scallions. Serve immediately.

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Silken Tofu with Pickled Radish Soup

  • Servings: 2
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Simple Tofu Recipe

This is an modest but delightful dish made with delicate tofu and crunchy pickles in a savory broth. For a heartier variation, you can add pre-cooked chicken slivers to the soup (left over rotisserie chicken, anyone?)


Credit: cookboldfood.com

Ingredients

1 package of silken tofu
1 package of pickled radish
1 teaspoon of cooking oil
2 cups of water
1 scallion (thinly sliced)
Salt
Ground white pepper

Directions

1. Heat oil over medium high heat in a skillet. Add pickled radish. Stir until fragrant for about one minute.
2. Add the water, bring to a boil and season with salt and pepper, to taste. Add tofu into the water. Let it simmer and absorb the flavors of the broth for about 10 minutes. Scoop into a bowl, sprinkle on scallions. Serve immediately.

Pork Tang Yuan

Tang Yuan is a glutinous rice ball most commonly made with black sesame seeds or crushed peanuts. This version of Tang Yuan is savory and made with pork. This uncommon yet equally delicious version is a popular snack food in my hometown Fuzhou.

Tang Yuan is a glutinous rice ball most commonly made with black sesame seeds or crushed peanuts. This version of Tang Yuan is savory and made with pork. This uncommon yet equally delicious version is a popular snack food in my hometown Fuzhou.

Ingredients:

For the wrapper

1 cup of glutinous rice flour

1 cup of warm water (mix 1/2 cup of hot boiling water with 1/2 cup of cold running water)

For the filling

1/2 pound of ground pork

1 teaspoon of light soy sauce

1/2 teaspoon of cornstarch

1/4 teaspoon of salt

1/4 teaspoon of ground white pepper

Directions:

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Add warm water to glutinous rice flour and mix until there are no lumps.

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In a bowl, combine the pork, soy sauce, cornstarch, and ground white pepper. You can prepare the filling up to a day ahead, stored and covered in the fridge.

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Take a small piece of the wrapper dough and pressed with your thumb to make an indent all around. Add pork and enclose the wrapper by rolling into a ball.

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Prepare a pot of boiling water.

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Boil for about 10 minutes.

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Plate and ready to serve.

Pork Tang Yuan

  • Servings: 1
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Savory Glutinous Rice Ball made with Pork

Tang Yuan is a glutinous rice ball most commonly made with black sesame seeds or crushed peanuts. This version of Tang Yuan is savory and made with pork. This uncommon yet equally delicious version is a popular snack food in my hometown Fuzhou.


Credit: cookboldfood.com

Ingredients

For the wrapper
1 cup of glutinous rice flour
1 cup of warm water (mix 1/2 cup of hot boiling water with 1/2 cup of cold running water)
For the filling
1/2 pound of ground pork
1 teaspoon of light soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon of cornstarch
1/4 teaspoon of salt
1/4 teaspoon of ground white pepper

Directions

1. Add warm water to glutinous rice flour and mix until there are no lumps.
2. In a bowl, combine the pork, soy sauce, cornstarch, and ground white pepper. You can prepare the filling up to a day ahead, stored and covered in the fridge.
3. Take a small piece of the wrapper dough and pressed with your thumb to make an indent all around. Add pork and enclose the wrapper by rolling into a ball.
4. Prepare a pot of boiling water. Boil for about 10 minutes. Plate and ready to serve.

 

Fuzhou Bian Rou (Fuzhou Wontons)

A Fuzhou snack food to be eaten between meals usually paired with a bowl of peanut noodles.  Inexpensive and readily available everywhere across Fuzhou, locals usually eat this in restaurants or food stalls. One of my favorite foods from my childhood that I still enjoy so much today.

Ingredients:

Hong Kong style wonton wrapper

1/2 pound of ground pork

1 teaspoon of light soy sauce

1/4 teaspoon of salt

1/4 teaspoon of white pepper

3 quarts of water

Directions:

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In a bowl, mix together ground pork, soy sauce, salt, and white pepper.

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Scoop about half teaspoon of filling and spread it in the middle of the wrapper. Dip your finger in the dish of water and run it around the filling.

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Tightly pinch the wrapper around the filling. Be careful not to break the wrapper.

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In a large pot, bring about 3 quarts of water to a boil.

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Add the bian rou and gently stir to separate.  Cook for 4 mins and add a small cup of water to lower the temperature so the dumplings stay intact. Transfer to a bowl. Season with salt, scallions, vinegar. Serve.

Fuzhou Bian Rou (Fuzhou Wontons)

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: medium
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Delicious Snack Food

A Fuzhou snack food to be eaten between meals usually paired with a bowl of peanut noodles.  Inexpensive and readily available everywhere across Fuzhou, locals usually eat this in restaurants or food stalls. One of my favorite foods from my childhood that I still enjoy so much today.


Credit: cookboldfood.com

Ingredients

Hong Kong style wonton wrapper
1/2 pound of ground pork
1 teaspoon of light soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon of salt
1/4 teaspoon of white pepper
3 quart of water

Directions

1. In a bowl, mix together ground pork, soy sauce, salt, and white pepper.
2. Scoop about half teaspoon of filling and spread it in the middle of the wrapper. Dip your finger in the dish of water and run it around the filling.
3. Tightly pinch the wrapper around the filling. Be careful not to break the wrapper.
4. In a large pot, bring about 3 quarts of water to a boil.
5. Add the bian rou and gently stir to separate.  Cook for 4 mins and add a small cup of water to lower the temperature so the dumplings stay intact.
6. Transfer to a bowl. Season with salt, scallions, vinegar. Serve.

 

 

 

Shrimp Udon Noodle Soup

Light, quick, and full of umami flavor, the mysterious delicious fifth taste besides the sweet, sour, bitter, salty. This is a simple noodle dish I prepare for my family when I am short on time and need to make a meal large enough to feed four people. I used dried scallops which create the umami flavor in the soup. Dried scallops are hard to find. My mother in law brought them from China when she was visiting us. Other alternatives are dried anchovies or dried shrimps which create a similar umami flavor. You can use any type noodles of your choice. I usually use whatever I have available in my fridge or pantry. Let’s get started.

Continue reading “Shrimp Udon Noodle Soup”

Pork, Shrimp, Chives Wontons

Wontons can be found all over China, with different names and fillings. In Sichuan they are known as chao shou which means “folded hands”, in Cantonese speaking areas yun tun as “swallowing clouds”, in Shanghai hun dun meaning “primordial and central chaos”. I make small wontons and big wontons. Small wontons are made from a tiny pinch of minced pork that goes well with side of noodles while big wontons of the following recipe are stuffed with pork, shrimps, mushrooms, and chives.

Continue reading “Pork, Shrimp, Chives Wontons”